The Collaborators

The Collaborators

Ads and collaborative promotions not only buy journalistic silence, but innocence-through-association. Their very ubiquity across such a broad societal spectrum buys acceptance, and even tacit approval. (See An Ad-erage Day in the Life of a Kid.) Who disregards the health consequences of tobacco to assist in the addiction of a generation?

I figure if it's really so bad for you, they wouldn't be selling them everywhere. I mean, you walk into Stop 'N' Go, and there's a whole wall of them right up front at the cash register. If they were really *that* bad for you, they'd make them less accessible.

--18-year-old smoker, "Young, Carefree and in Love With Cigarettes," The New York Times, July 30, 1995

  • Lists of magazines/newspapers which REFUSE tobacco advertising.

  • Tobacco-ad-carrying magazines the FDA Rule refers to in its discussion of youth readership
  • Tobacco-Ad-Carrying Magazines in the News

  • You can go to Adbusters' site and send a simultaneous letter to The Dirty Dozen . . . a gang of 12 noxious magazines (Cosmopolitan, People, Better Homes, Playboy, Time, TV Guide, Newsweek, Family Circle, McCall's, Woman's Day, U.S. News, Sports Illustrated)

  • Corporations that collaborate in the Marketing of Cigarette Brands
  • Cultural Institutions that collaborate in the marketing of cigarette brands, or accept industry donations
  • Individual Collaborators
  • Charitable and Cultural Organizations that have REFUSED tobacco industry money
  • Drug Stores and Groceries that actively collaborate
  • Drug Stores and Groceries that REFUSE to collaborate
  • Take your business where people care.

    The Collaborators


    I figure if it's really so bad for you, they wouldn't be selling them everywhere. I mean, you walk into Stop 'N' Go, and there's a whole wall of them right up front at the cash register. If they were really *that* bad for you, they'd make them less accessible.

    --18-year-old smoker, "Young, Carefree and in Love With Cigarettes," The New York Times, July 30, 1995

    When all the garbage is stripped away, successful cigarette advertising involves showing the kind of people most people would like to be, doing the things most people would like to do, and smoking up a storm. I don't know any way of doing this that doesn't tempt young people to smoke.

    -- advertising executive who worked on the Marlboro account, quoted in the 1994 Surgeon General's Report. Consumer Reports, March, 1995
    I. The Promoters

    Consider the never-ending flow of cigarette advertising and promotions, and their association with non-tobacco entities like sports figures, movie stars, corporations, grocery stores, the local pharmacy, doctor's office or even one's own living room. By their very ubiquity, coupled with their acceptance by the rest of society--including highly admired individuals and corporations--this flood of promotions serves to give silent rebuttal to the truth about tobacco.


    "The tobacco industry buys silence from these groups . . . Even if that's not made explicit, that's what happens. It's had a tremendous impact because these are the very groups that most need to speak out, and they won't." -- Jean Kilbourne, Wellesley College, speaking of tobacco industry donations to black and women's organizations.

    "They are peddling an addictive and lethal drug, and their ability to market their product depends on their ability to say they are a legitimate member of American society." --Michael Pertschuk, former chairman of the Federal Trade Commission, current codirector of the Advocacy Institute in Washington:

    "Thank God for sinners. They're the only people to support the arts." --anonymous dance company spokeswoman

    "Like the reaction of so many to the relationship between culture and cigarettes, the comment [above] had at its core the argument that the end justifies the means. Only it doesn't." --Anna Quindlen


    II. The Pointedly Silent Legitimizers

    Philanthropic contributions to arts, charity and cultural organizations are effective in buying legitimacy and silence. Institutions that have accepted tobacco industry philanthropy may or may not believe there is no quid-pro-quo, but in a crunch, many have been urged to speak up for tobacco industry goals to political bodies. In 1994 in New York City, Philip Morris let its donees know that if a smokefree bill passed, PM contributions might dry up. The note urged institutions--some shocked, some more than willing to comply--to speak with their legislators.

    By the mere fact of accepting tobacco industry donations, an organization lends a little of its legitimacy and status to tobacco companies, allowing the companies to shift the focus away from their commonly-perceived roles as merchants of death. Such an organization cannot be unaware it risks losing those donations if its members speak out about the 400,000 dead a year from tobacco-related diseases.

    "If they kill off cigarette and alcohol advertising, black papers may as well stop printing." -- Keith Lockart, president of Lockart & Pettus, Inc., an African-American advertising agency.

    "Groups representing those communities would be speaking out in opposition to aggressive marketing of the tobacco industry .... But what you see are groups like National Urban League and NAACP, who need the money and take the money from RJR and Philip Morris, saying not word one about this problem that afflicts their community. Groups in the gay community are by and large silent on this same concern. You could infer that tobacco company contributions, while helpful on the one hand, are buying silence on the other."-- Cliff Douglas of the Advocacy Institute

    It is in this vein then, that the Tobacco BBS sets out to create a database of enablers -- those who by lending their good name, help establish the ubiquity and seemingly everyday innocuousness of smoking, help foster the legitimacy of tobacco companies, and help collaborate in the lie that cigarettes couldn't possibly be "*that* bad for you."



  • Tobacco-ad-carrying magazines the FDA Rule refers to in its discussion of youth readership

  • The FDA's estimations are based on 1994 data from MediaMark Research Inc. and Simmons Market Research Bureau, Inc

    The number "1" after a magazine means the MediaMark measurement of youth readership exceeds the regulatory threshold of 2 million readers or 15 percent of total readership below the age of 18.

    The number "2" after a magazine means the Simmons measurement of youth readership exceeds the regulatory threshold of 2 million readers or 15 percent of total readership below the age of 18.

    Source: Barents Group LLC Tables IV-1 and A-2; Simmons Market Research Bureau, Inc.; R. Craig Endicott, "The Ad Age 300," Advertising Age, June 19, 1995.

    The FDA rule goes on to say:

    The final regulation requires that specific youth and adult readership data be available for any magazine that displays a tobacco advertisement with color or imagery. Simmons currently conducts interviews with adults in approximately 20,000 households annually and subsequently returns to about 3,000 of these households to interview their youth members. In general, however, marketing research firms collect data on youth readership only for those magazines commonly read by this age group. Thus, although 78 percent and 48 percent of the magazines in the two youth readership samples described above exceeded the regulatory readership threshold, these sample results likely overestimate the percentage of magazines with current tobacco ads that exceed the threshold.

    Simmons now collects adult readership data for about 230 magazines and youth readership for about 65 magazines. Because tobacco manufacturers currently advertise in about 100 magazines, the industry could often add magazines that are currently part of an ongoing adult readership survey to a youth survey, saving approximately 60 percent of the cost of collecting both adult and youth data.


  • Tobacco-Ad-Carrying Magazines in the News

  • You can go to Adbusters' site and send a simultaneous letter to The Dirty Dozen . . . a gang of 12 noxious magazines (Cosmopolitan, People, Better Homes, Playboy, Time, TV Guide, Newsweek, Family Circle, McCall's, Woman's Day, U.S. News, Sports Illustrated.)

  • Between Time Inc.'s Sports Illustrated, People, Time and Entertainment Weekly, Publisher's Information Bureau estimates placed the company's cigarette ad revenue in 1995 at $88.9 million--or roughly 27.5% of all cigarette advertising placed in consumer magazines.

  • ELLE takes flack for its Elle Cigarette Case

  • Cosmopolitan 800-888-2676
  • Redbook
  • Sports Illustrated 800-528-5000
  • [NOTE: the Spring 1999 issue of Sports Illustrated for Women announced that it will stop accepting cigarette ads.]

  • Life Magazine 800-621-6000
  • Ebony Magazine
  • Essence Magazine
  • National Black Monitor/Black Media, Inc.

  • USA Weekend
  • From Jon Krueger: A Sunday newspaper filler magazine published by Gannett, USAW often carries tobacco ads. Its Feb 25-27 2000 issue includes an article titled "5 (fairly painless) ways to cut your risk of cancer". The article covers diet, what to eat, what not to eat, to lower cancer risk. It discusses alcohol, vitamin supplements (including a recommendation for folic acid to reduce lung cancer risk, among others) and exercise. It mever mentions smoking. This is an article about cutting cancer risk that says not one word about smoking, cigarettes, or tobacco. The issue also includes a full page, full color, back cover ad for Doral, an RJR product. According to Bob Allen, a USA Weekend advertising person I spoke with today, that ad would have cost RJR about $270,000.

    Corporations that collaborate in the Marketing of Cigarette Brands

  • Coca-Cola

  • Ticketmaster
  • Panasonic 201-349-7000
  • Kellogg's
  • P.O. Box CAMB
    Battle Creek, MI 49016-1986
    (800) 962-1413 8 am-8 pm EST

  • Mobil
  • Marlboro Team Penske

  • Renault
  • Rothmans Williams Renault

  • Benetton
  • Mild Seven/Benetton/Renault Racing Team

  • Toyota
  • Subaru
  • Land Rover

  • Cultural Institutions that collaborate in the marketing of cigarette brands or lend tobacco companies legitimacy by accepting industry donations

    According to William Ecenbarger of the Philadelphia Inquirer, "Philip Morris gave $30,000 to the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington for an exhibition in 1987. At the opening, a gallery official complained about little packs of cigarettes being distributed free of charge. Soon after, Philip Morris told Corcoran it would no longer fund the museum, citing the complaint as one reason."

    The following are arts institutions that reportedly are more cooperative.

  • Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • 5th Avenue & 82nd St.
    NY, NY 10028
    212-570-3726

  • Whitney Museum of American Art
  • 945 Madison Avenue (75th St.)
    NY, NY 10021
    212-570-3676

  • Whitney Museum at Philip Morris
  • 120 Park Ave. (42nd St, in the Philip Morris building)
    New York, NY 10017
    212-878-2550

  • Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM)
  • 30 Lafayette Ave.
    Brooklyn, NY 11217
    718-636-4122

  • Museum of Modern Art
  • 11 W.53rd St.
    NY, NY 10019-5498
    212-708-9480

  • Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
  • 70 Lincoln Center Plaza
    NYC, NY 10023-6971

  • Museum of American Folk Art
  • American Association Of Museums
  • Morgan Library
  • Guggenheim Museum
  • International Center of Photography
  • 1994: Philip Morris sponsored the "Talking Pictures" exhibition

  • Alliance for the Arts
  • According to Randall Bourscheidt, executive director of the umbrella organization, "Arts organizations don't have the luxury of turning down money from any source. . . generosity as large and as widespread as Philip Morris's has a major impact on New York and the country."

  • American Ballet Theater
  • American Museum of Natural History
  • Franklin Furnace
  • Joyce Theater
  • B Dance Theater Workshop
  • P.S. 122
  • Crossroads Theater
  • Yoshiko Chuma and the School of Hard Knocks
  • Intar Hispanic American Arts Center
  • La Mama
  • Studio Museum
  • Dance Theater of Harlem
  • Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
  • Kennedy Center Washington, DC
  • MacDowell Colony
  • William Campbell, president of Philip Morris USA until 1995, has been a board member.

  • Joffrey Ballet
  • Stephanie French, vice president for corporate contributions and cultural affairs for Philip Morris was a board member as of 1994.

  • American Civil Liberties Union
  • United Negro College Fund
  • National Urban League
  • Congressional Black Caucus
  • NAACP
  • Black Journalism Hall of Fame
  • National Newspaper Publishers Association
  • Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies
  • National Black Caucus of State Legislators
  • National Council of La Raza

  • National Association of Hispanic Publications
  • National Association of Hispanic Journalists
  • National Puerto Rican Coalition
  • National Association of Bilingual Education (NABE)
  • United Jewish Appeal Federation of New York
  • Gay Men's Health Crisis
  • Gay and Lesbian Alliance
  • Act-Up (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power)
  • American Council on Alcoholism
  • National Organization for Women Legal Defense & Education Fund
  • National Association of Media Women
  • League of Women Voters
  • Phillips Academy
  • A row erupted in August, 1995 over this Andover, MA private school's acceptance of a $200,000 grant from Philip Morris, earmarked for the recruitment of minorities into teaching.

  • Yale Divinity School
  • Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund
  • Discovery Place children's science museum (Charlotte, N.C.)
  • Tisch Children's Zoo (Central Park, New York City)
  • In 1997, LAURENCE A. TISCH agreed to donate $4.5 million to the renovation of the Children's Zoo in Central Park, and the WILDLIFE CONSERVATION SOCIETY agreed to rename the children's zoo after the head of a tobacco company (Tisch is co-chairman of LOEWS, which owns LORILLARD Tobacco.)

  • 4-H Club--North Carolina

  • Individual Collaborators

  • Theodore Hesburgh, president emeritus of Notre Dame

  • Charitable and Cultural Organizations that have REFUSED tobacco industry money

  • Coalition for the Homeless
  • National Association of Black Journalists

  • Drug Stores and Groceries that actively collaborate

    Getting your prescription filled? How much do you think a store that hawks cigarettes knows about health matters? How much do you think they care? How scrupulously clean do you think such a grocery store will be? How careful do you think they are when handling your meat, dairy products and frozen food?

    Your health or their money--which do you think comes first?


    Drug Stores and Groceries that REFUSE to collaborate

  • National Chains

  • Local
  • New York State
  • Connecticut
  • Utah
  • Michigan
  • Georgia

  • This document's URL is: http://www.tobacco.org/Misc/collaborators.html


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  • 1998 Gene Borio, Tobacco BBS (212-982-4645). WebPage: http://www.tobacco.org).Original Tobacco BBS material may be reprinted in any non-commercial venue if accompanied by this credit

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