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Health/Science
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Categories
· Health/Science
· Teen Smoking/Youth

National Study: Teen “Heavy” Marijuana Use Up 80 Percent Since 2008, One in Ten Teens Reports Using Marijuana at Least 20 Times a Month 

Only Half of Teens, 51 Percent, Now Say They See “Great Risk” in Using Marijuana Regularly
Jump to full article: The Partnership at Drugfree.org , 2012-05-01

Categories
· Health/Science
· Teen Smoking/Youth
USA, by State
· New York

Drug Fans: More Teens Smoke Weed Than Cigarettes; The War On Drugs Has Failed  

Jump to full article: Village Voice blogs, 2012-05-03
Author: By James King

Intro:

The study, the 23rd annual Partnership Attitude Tracking Study, shows that teen marijuana use is up, with 27-percent of teens (about 1.5 million) admitting to smoking weed in the past month. That's up from 19-percent in 2008.

In contrast, according to the Drug Policy Alliance, teens who admitted to smoking cigarettes in the past month is on the decline, with 22-percent of teens copping to smoking in the past month. That's down from 27-percent last year. . . .

The problem, according to the DPA: the prohibitionist approach to marijuana policy isn't working, and the "war on drugs" is a failure.

"The continued decline in teen cigarette smoking is great news - not just because it's the most deadly drug but also because it reveals that legal regulation and honest education are more effective than prohibition and criminalization," DPA publications manager Jag Davies says. "Although the U.S. arrests 750,000 people every year for nothing more than possessing a small amount of marijuana, teens consistently report that marijuana is easier to obtain than alcohol."

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Cessation
· Alcohol
· Vaccines

Varenicline decreases alcohol consumption in heavy-drinking smokers.  

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2012 May 1. [Epub ahead of print]
Jump to full article: National Institutes of Health (NIH), 2012-05-03

Categories
· Health/Science
· Cessation
· Alcohol
· Vaccines

Anti-Smoking Drug Decreases Alcohol Consumption in Heavy-Drinking Smokers 

Jump to full article: Newswise, 2012-05-03

Intro:

The smoking cessation drug varenicline significantly reduced alcohol consumption in a group of heavy-drinking smokers, in a study carried out by researchers at the Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center at the University of California, San Francisco.

“Alcohol abuse is a huge problem, and this is a big step forward in identifying a potential new treatment,” said senior author Howard L. Fields, MD, PhD, professor of neurology and director of the Wheeler Center for the Neurobiology of Addiction at UCSF.

The study was published on May 1 in the journal Psychopharmacology.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Cessation
· Cardio-vascular
· Vaccines

Cardiovascular safety concerns over smoking-cessation drug misleading 

An extensive UCSF study questions previous study's analytic methods
Jump to full article: EurekAlert, 2012-05-03

Intro:

A popular smoking cessation medication has been under a cloud of suspicion ever since the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) published a study in July 2011 reporting "risk of serious adverse cardiovascular events associated with varenicline." Varenicline, also known as Chantix, blocks the pleasant effects of nicotine on the smoker's brain and lessens nicotine withdrawal symptoms.

UCSF researchers, however, question the way the previous study was conducted, and their new analysis, scheduled to be published May 4 in BMJ, reaches a very different conclusion.

"We found no clinically or statistically significant increase in serious adverse cardiovascular events associated with using varenicline," said lead author Judith J. Prochaska, PhD, MPH, an associate professor in UCSF's Department of Psychiatry and researcher with the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education. "The findings from 22 trials with more than 9,200 participants indicate a difference in risk of only 0.27 percent between those on varenicline versus placebo, or about a quarter of one percent."

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Lawsuits
non-USA, by Country
· Canada
Organizations
· BAT
· Imperial (ca)

1980s 'safer cigarette' research opposed: former executive  

Former Imperial Tobacco Canada president testifies in class-action lawsuit
Jump to full article: CBC News (ca), 2012-05-03

Intro:

A former president of Imperial Tobacco Canada says the company's largest shareholder attempted to stop an effort to develop safer cigarettes.

Jean-Louis Mercier testified Thursday in the $2-billion class-action lawsuit against Canada's tobacco industry, which was launched by Quebec smokers.

Mercier said in the 1980s he came up with an idea after reading a report by the surgeon general of the United States. The report found tar and nicotine were among the cancer-causing agents in cigarettes.

The former president said he figured cigarettes would become safer if they contained lower amounts of the two carcinogens, so he spearheaded an internal study to try to develop a safer cigarette.

But Mercier said Imperial Tobacco Canada's largest shareholder, British American Tobacco, opposed the effort. He said BAT's chairman at the time sent a letter indicating ITC's research was risky.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Tobacco Control
non-USA, by Country
· Gambia

RAID Workshop Validates Tobacco Control Action-Plan  

Jump to full article: Foroyaa Newspaper (gm), 2012-05-02

Categories
· Health/Science
· Federal/National
· Tobacco Control
Organizations
· FDA

Putting the science behind FDA’s tobacco regulation  

Jump to full article: The Washington Post, 2012-04-29
Author: The Partnership for Public Service

Intro:

The law giving the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authority to regulate tobacco products requires that it base decisions on science, including proposals to reduce the harm caused to those who smoke and to discourage youngsters from using tobacco.

Leading this ambitious effort is David Ashley, the science director of the FDA's Center's for Tobacco Products, who sees his job as "an incredible opportunity to have an impact on public health." . . .

Ashley said he has spent the past two years hiring a staff of about 70 people, "getting our feet on the ground," establishing the research agenda, and building relationships with outside organizations like the National Institutes of Health that will conduct the scientific inquiries.

He said some of the top priorities for research include looking at ways to reduce addiction to tobacco products; reducing the toxicity and carcinogenicity of tobacco products and smoke; understanding the adverse health consequences of tobacco use; and better understanding communications and marketing regarding tobacco products.

Ashley said the science agenda as well as the work of the entire tobacco regulatory center has been steadily making progress. However, he said one of the frustrations is that decisions are not made as fast as he would like.

"There are good reasons for that," said Ashley. "We need to get input from many different stakeholders in order that the decisions we make will be the most appropriate and most effective."

Nevertheless, Ashley said that it is "a challenge to know that for every day a decision is delayed and we cannot act, about 1200 people die from using tobacco products."

Kim Elliott, the associate director at the FDA's Center for Tobacco Products, said Ashley is "a world renowned chemist who has tremendous expertise on tobacco product design and what goes into the products."

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Categories
· Health/Science
· International
· Related
· Books
· Lobbying

AUDIO: ExxonMobil: A 'Private Empire' On The World Stage 

Jump to full article: National Public Radio (NPR), 2012-05-02
Author: Steve Coll

Intro:

ExxonMobil And Climate Change

Until 2005, ExxonMobil was run by Lee "Iron Ass" Raymond, a close friend of Vice President Dick Cheney and a skeptic of climate change. During Raymond's tenure, Exxon funded campaigns to challenge the validity of emerging science about climate change -- specifically the findings that a global warming trend existed.

"This not only borrowed from some of the tactics that the tobacco industry had used to delay public understanding of the dangers of smoking; in some cases there were even overlaps of individuals and groups that were engaged in this communications campaign," Coll tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "A lot of corporate America opposed the Kyoto Accords. But only a small set of companies did what Exxon did, which was to really go after the science as aggressively as they did."

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Business (Tobacco)
· Tax
· Pipes
· Roll-your-own
· waivers/exceptions
USA, by State
· New York

New York lost $16.9 million from tobacco tax loophole 

Jump to full article: Ithaca (NY) Journal, 2012-05-03
Author: Written by Brian Tumulty

Intro:

New York lost an estimated $16.9 million in potential tobacco tax revenue during the first 28 months following a federal excise tax increase on cigarettes, small cigars and roll-your-own tobacco.

That's the finding of a new report released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which said states collectively lost $374 million in tobacco revenue from April 2009 to August 2011 because of a market shift to lower-priced pipe tobacco to make roll-your-own cigarettes.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Business (Tobacco)
· Federal/National
· Tax
· Pipes
· Roll-your-own

Fiscal and Policy Implications of Selling Pipe Tobacco for Roll-Your-Own Cigarettes in the United States 

Jump to full article: Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2012-05-02
Author: Publication Date/Subject

Intro:

Conclusions

Marketing pipe tobacco as “dual purpose" and selling it for RYO use provides an opportunity to avoid paying higher cigarette prices. This blunts the public health impact excise tax increases would otherwise have on reducing tobacco use through higher prices. Selling pipe tobacco for RYO use decreases state and Federal revenue and also avoids regulations on flavored tobacco, banned descriptors, prohibitions on shipping, and reporting requirements.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· International
· Tobacco Control
· Smokefree Policies
· Op-Ed
· Industry Watch
non-USA, by Country
· Europe

Why is tobacco control still a problem in Europe? 

Jump to full article: Oxford University Press Blog, 2012-05-03
Author: Ann McNeill, Lorraine Craig, Marc C. Willemsen &

Intro:

Tobacco control in the EU is at a crossroads. Ideally, politicians and civil servants will clearly delineate and make transparent all contacts with the tobacco industry and those in their pay, as per Article 5.3 in the FCTC. We also call on European governments and the EU to take a more robust stance and legislate more effectively to protect European citizens. The first test of the EC’s willingness to do so will be the revision of the Tobacco Products Directive. We await the outcome of that process.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· International
· Tobacco Control
· Smokefree Policies
· Industry Watch
non-USA, by Country
· Europe

Table of Contents - February 2012, 22 (suppl 1): Progress on Tobacco Control in Europe: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Project  

Jump to full article: European Journal of Public Health, 2012-02-01
Author: how much would limiting TV food advertising reduce childhood

Intro:

  • Tobacco control in Europe: A deadly lack of progress

  • Comparative impact of smoke-free legislation on smoking cessation in three European countries

  • Comprehensive smoke-free policies attract more support from smokers in Europe than partial policies

  • Predictors of car smoking rules among smokers in France, Germany and the Netherlands

  • Smoking cessation interventions from health care providers before and after the national smoke-free law in France

  • Outdoor smoking behaviour and support for outdoor smoking restrictions before and after France's national smoking ban

  • Do smokers in Europe think all cigarettes are equally harmful?

  • Struggling to make ends meet: exploring pathways to understand why smokers in financial difficulties are less likely to quit successfully

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  • Categories
    · Health/Science
    non-USA, by Country
    · Philippines

    Environment linked to unhealthy behavior  

    Jump to full article: ABS-CBN Broadcasting Corporation (ph), 2012-05-03

    Intro:

    In a statement released by Health Justice, a non-governmental organization, Dr. Antonio Miguel Dans of the Philippine General Hospital said non-communicable diseases such as heart problems are brought by the presence of cheap junk food and cigarettes, as well as lack of places to exercise.

    "One misconception is that lifestyle is a choice. It is not. Lifestyle is a human response to the physical, social and even regulatory environment," Dans said.

    "We eat unhealthy because junk food is very cheap. We don't exercise because there is no place to exercise. And we smoke because we are exposed to advertisements even when we're young, and because smoking is the cheapest form of leisure available.

    "We can try to educate everyone as much as we can but unless we change the factors that lead to these unhealthy behaviors, people will not change the way they live."

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    Categories
    · Health/Science
    · Federal/National
    · Tax
    non-USA, by Country
    · Czech Repulic

    Czech press survey - May 3  

    Jump to full article: Czech Happenings, 2012-05-03

    Intro:

    The Czech state seems to be inappropriately benevolent to people´s addiction to drugs, including alcohol and tobacco, as well as gambling, Martin Zverina writes in Lidove noviny in reaction to the Bloomberg agency´s survey showing the Czech Republic´s world primacy in this respect. Since Russia has ended only 20th in the list, the survey should not be taken for unshakable truth. Prague should rather consider why the Czechs have been declared the worst addicts of all, Zverina writes. Benevolence in relation to the misuse of alcohol and tobacco has always been really huge in the Czech Republic. Smokers, for example, tend to present themselves as significant taxpayers and pass off their addiction for a merit, Zverina says.

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    Health/Science
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