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Categories
· Teen Smoking/Youth
· Smokefree Policies
· Schools
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark

New smoking law attacked from both sides 

While the opposition argues the government's new smoking law is far too strict, anti-smoking charities say it does not go far enough
Jump to full article: Copenhagen Post (dk), 2012-04-23
Author: Jyllands-Posten

Intro:

following the government’s new smoking law that was agreed on last Saturday with support from Enhedslisten, many will find their right to smoke has been taken away from them – and completely unnecessarily, argues opposition party Venstre (V).

“We think that the current smoking laws are perfectly adequate and that there are far more important things to debate,” V’s health spokesperson, Sophie Løhde, said. “Citizens can think for themselves and don’t need detailed manuals from the government.”

The new law will ban smoking in education institutions for children and youths as well as in single-person offices, though there will be exceptions for company cars, trucks and cranes as long as there is only person present in the vehicle at the time.

Dansk Folkeparti (DF) were also vocal critics of the new smoking law, arguing that the ban on smoking in single-person offices is over-protective while schools are already good at introducing their own anti-smoking policies.

“I actually think that the new smoking law will mean more people will become exposed to tobacco smoke as everyone files outside to smoke by the entrances to buildings,” Henrik Thulesen Dahl from DF said. "They become more visible and so may also inspire more people to smoke."

The health minister, Astrid Krag (Socialistisk Folkeparti) dismissed Dahl’s criticisms. . . .

Factfile – New smoking laws

Total ban on smoking at education institutions for children and youths, such as day care institutions, primary and middle schools and high schools.

Total ban on smoking in single-person offices.

Increased fines for breaking the smoking law and for selling tobacco to youths under 18. In both cases a first offence will cost 5,000 kroner, a second 10,000 kroner and a third 20,000 kroner.

Increased support for people wanting to quit including 1.5 million kroner for the marketing of the help line, Stoplinien.

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Categories
· Smokefree Policies
· Elections/Politics
· waivers/exceptions
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark

Party to pay for PM’s puffs 

Jump to full article: Icenews (is), 2012-03-18

Intro:

Denmark’s Liberal Party says it will foot the bill for a controversial smoking cabin that was installed in the office of former Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen, so as not to divert attention away from “important political work”.

On the request of Løkke Rasmussen, the ministry calculated that the booth cost DKK 110,600 (EUR 14,900), but it had not been decided whether or not the former PM would reimburse the party from his own pocket.

“The issue risks moving the focus away from the important political work that the Liberal Party has to carry out. So the party has decided to pay the bill,” Party Secretary Claus Søgaard-Richter said in a report by Politiken.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Cessation
· Pregnancy
· Nicotine
· Women
· Mental Health/Neurology
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark

Nicotine Patch in Pregnancy Might Lead to Colic  

Jump to full article: MedPage Today, 2012-02-20
Author: Crystal Phend, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Intro:

Action Points

Explain that pregnant women who used nicotine replacement therapy was associated with an increased risk of infantile colic.

Note that by comparison, smokers' babies were at 30% higher risk of colic than those not exposed to any source of nicotine in the population-based birth cohort study.

Women trying nicotine replacement therapy to quit smoking while pregnant might find that they end up with a fussy baby, according to an observational study.

Women who used nicotine replacement therapy -- patches, gum, or inhaler -- saw an adjusted odds ratio of infantile colic of 1.6 (95% CI 1-2.5, P=0.03), reported Ioanna Milidou, MD, of Aarhus University Hospital in Aarhus, Denmark, and colleagues in the March issue of Pediatrics.

By comparison, smokers' babies were at 30% higher risk of colic than those not exposed to any source of nicotine in the population-based birth cohort study.

Nicotine replacement therapy has been considered a safer alternative to continued smoking in pregnancy and thus seen increasing use among pregnant women, Milidou's group explained.

These results shouldn't be considered a contraindication for nicotine replacement therapy for women who can't stop smoking without it, they cautioned.

But the risk seen does warrant more investigation into safety for use in pregnancy, they added.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Federal/National
· Tobacco Control
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark

Creeping legislation threatens national smoking habit  

Jump to full article: Copenhagen Post (dk), 2012-02-17
Author: Peter Stanners

Intro:

An increasing number of initiatives are starting to lessen the grip of smokers in Denmark though some argue more needs to be done to bring down tobacco related deaths

Smoking might be becoming less popular in Denmark but the government is still hesitant to cut too deep into smoker's rights, which means it is still permitted in small bars (Photos: Scanpix). At bottom, one of the pictures that must now be included on cigarette packages. This one states "Smoking shortens your life"

In a modern and sophisticated country, looked up to for its welfare state, the popularity of smoking is a stain on an otherwise positive international reputation.

But a variety of initiatives, laws and public statements made over the past few months seem to suggest that smoking in Denmark isn’t quite as cool as it used to be.

Most recently, a debate was triggered when the health spokesperson for government party Radikale, Camilla Hersom, said that she would ban cigarettes in Denmark in a perfect world. . . .

So while attempts are being made to limit smoking in Denmark, there is still a resistance to fully embracing a tobacco-free culture. And while there are some positive signs – 400,000 Danes have quit smoking since 2007 according to the health ministry – 4,500 Danes still die every year from tobacco-related cancers.

For now then, Danes in smoky ‘brown bodegas’ and cabinet members in their own offices will continue to smoke cigarettes whose prices are kept low by manufacturers who sell packs of 18 or 19 instead of 20 in order to balance out increases to tobacco taxes such as the three kroner added over new year – a practice outlawed in Germany but perhaps not unsurprisingly in Denmark.

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Categories
· Business (Tobacco)
· Lawsuits
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark
Organizations
· BAT

Danish nicotine case to go to Supreme Court  

Jump to full article: Tobacco Reporter, 2012-02-03

Intro:

A former smoker is to appeal against a Danish Eastern High Court ruling dismissing allegations that two tobacco companies manipulated nicotine contents, according to an Esmerk Danish News story.

Allan Lykken Jensen alleged that the Scandinavian Tobacco Group and British American Tobacco had manipulated the nicotine content of Prince cigarettes.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Cardio-vascular
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark

25 year trends in first time hospitalisation for acute myocardial infarction, subsequent short and long term mortality, and the prognostic impact of sex and comorbidity: a Danish nationwide cohort study 

OPEN ACCESS BMJ 2012; 344 doi: 10.1136/bmj.e356 (Published 25 January 2012)
Jump to full article: British Medical Journal, 2012-01-25

Intro:

Conclusions The rate of first time hospitalisation for myocardial infarction and subsequent short term mortality both declined by nearly half between 1984 and 2008. The reduction in mortality occurred for all patients, independent of sex and comorbidity. However, comorbidity burden was a strong prognostic factor for short and long term mortality, while sex was not.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Business (Tobacco)
· Secret Documents
· Lobbying
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark
· Sweden
· Norway

Local Nordic tobacco interests collaborated with multinational companies to maintain a united front and undermine tobacco control policies [FREE FULL TEXT] 

Jump to full article: Tobacco Control, 2011-12-23

Intro:

Implications for the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

Article 20 of WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control commits parties to promote and facilitate the exchange of information regarding practices of the tobacco industry.193 In implementing this requirement, it is essential for parties to focus on the operations of the multinational companies and on local tobacco companies and their organisations. Local companies may claim ignorance of multinational companies' strategies to undermine tobacco control while implementing those strategies secretly. . . .

Conclusions

Global tobacco control is contingent on diffusion of policy innovations and more comprehensive tobacco control policies. Local tobacco companies in the Nordic countries participated in the multinational companies' conspiracy to deny health dangers of smoking and oppose tobacco control measures because of the direct effects in Nordic countries and because of concern that such policies would spread to other countries. They worked individually and through NMAs with multinational companies to undermine tobacco control. As a result, tobacco control measures, particularly smoke-free laws, were delayed for several years. The local tobacco companies have publicly claimed ignorance of multinational tobacco company strategies while in fact they are implementing them vigorously. These experiences emphasise the importance for both sides of the debate of setting and defending precedents in tobacco control. They also demonstrate that in local debates over Framework Convention on Tobacco Control implementation, public health advocates and government officials cannot trust assertions by local tobacco companies that they are simply representing local interests, not those of the multinational tobacco companies.

What this paper adds

Tobacco companies and national manufacturer associations in Nordic countries have claimed that they have not been part of multinational tobacco companies' strategies to deny health hazards of smoking and undermine tobacco control as part of a successful effort to avoid liability for tobacco-induced disease and to oppose tobacco control policies.

Multinational tobacco companies engaged local tobacco companies in the Nordic countries to ensure a uniform position in denying health dangers of smoking and opposing tobacco control measures because of the direct effects in Nordic countries and because of concern that such policies would spread to other countries. The Nordic experience demonstrates the importance of setting and defending both good and bad precedents in tobacco control for both sides of the debate. It also demonstrates that in local debates over Framework Convention on Tobacco Control implementation, public health advocates and government officials cannot trust assertions by local tobacco companies that they are simply representing local interests, not those of the multinational tobacco companies.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Business (Tobacco)
· Secret Documents
· Tobacco Control
· Lobbying
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark
· Sweden
· Norway
Organizations
· Altria/Philip Morris
· BAT

Local Nordic tobacco interests collaborated with multinational companies to maintain a united front and undermine tobacco control policies  

Tob Control doi:10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050149
Jump to full article: Tobacco Control, 2011-12-23

Intro:

Objective

To analyse how local tobacco companies in the Nordic countries, individually and through National Manufacturers' Associations, cooperated with British American Tobacco and Philip Morris in denying the health hazards of smoking and undermining tobacco control.

Methods

Analysis of tobacco control policies in the Nordic countries and tobacco industry documents.

Results

Nordic countries were early adopters of tobacco control policies. The multinational tobacco companies recognised this fact and mobilised to oppose these policies, in part because of fear that they would set unfavourable precedents. Since at least 1972, the Nordic tobacco companies were well informed about and willing to participate in the multinational companies activities to obscure the health dangers of smoking and secondhand smoke and to oppose tobacco control policies. Cooperation between multinational companies, Nordic national manufacturer associations and local companies ensured a united front on smoking and health issues in the Nordic area that was consistent with the positions that the multinational companies were taking. This cooperation delayed smoke-free laws and undermined other tobacco control measures.

Conclusions

Local tobacco companies worked with multinational companies to undermine tobacco control in distant and small Nordic markets because of concern that pioneering policies initiated in Nordic countries would spread to bigger market areas. Claims by the local Nordic companies that they were not actively involved with the multinationals are not supported by the facts. These results also demonstrate that the industry appreciates the global importance of both positive and negative public health precedents in tobacco control.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Nicotine
· Mental Health/Neurology
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark

Nicotine worsens processing ability 

Nicotine gives you a kick-start, but the benefit stops there. New research shows that nicotine affects our information processing ability in several ways.
Jump to full article: ScienceNordic.com (dk), 2011-12-19
Author: Charlotte Price Persson

Intro:

The brain gets a kick-start - but after that its performance progressively deteriorates.

A non-smoker with only the natural amounts nicotine in the blood can process around 70 elements per second, while a non-smoker with nicotine in the blood can process only 55 elements, according to a new study.

"These are significant results because nicotine is often presented as a performance-enhancing substance in public debates. This can help us to refine the picture," says Signe Vangkilde, who has just defended her thesis, entitled 'Modulations of Visual Attention in Time and Space', at the Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen.

Faster and worse

The bar chart shows that non-smokers without nicotine in the blood were able to process more information than nicotine-affected non-smokers and smokers. (Illustration: Signe Vangkilde)

Previous studies focused on getting test subjects to answer as quickly as possible, she says. But that has only helped to distort the picture.

"Nicotine-affected subjects answer faster than non-nicotine affected subjects, so nicotine has long been regarded as a performance-enhancing substance," she says. "But I wanted to examine what happens when you omit motor skills - which relate only to how quickly test subjects answer and not how well."

In other words, she wanted to determine whether the performance of nicotine-affected subjects was faster and better, or faster and worse. Her findings indicate the latter.

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Categories
· Smokefree Policies
· Elections/Politics
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark

Minister’s taxpayer-funded smoking box causes a stink – UPDATED  

Jump to full article: Copenhagen Post (dk), 2011-12-21
Author: Justin Cremer

Intro:

The food, agriculture and fisheries minister, Mette Gjerskov, announced Monday evening that she had now decided to pay for a smoking booth she had installed in her office using taxpayer funds.

"It's never been a question of whether I was trying to get out of paying for the smoking booth – it was strictly about solving a practical problem," Gjerskov said in a statement.

"It's important for me not to expose others to second-hand smoke, and it goes without saying that I abide by smoking laws. But I've heard the criticism and will pay for the smoking booth myself."

The food, agriculture and fisheries minister, Mette Gjerskov of the Socialdemokraterne (S), is under fire for her decision to install a smoking booth in her office. It’s not the unhealthy habit that is causing a rift, however, but the fact that 33,744 kroner of taxpayers’ money went towards providing Gjerskov with her own private smoking area.

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Categories
· Lawsuits
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark

50-year smoker loses cigarette company case  

Jump to full article: Icenews (is), 2011-12-16

Intro:

A Danish man who encountered health problems after 50 years of smoking has lost his legal fight against the tobacco company he favoured.

Allan Lykke Jensen told the Copenhagen High Court that although he knew it was unhealthy to smoke, House of Prince cigarettes contained more nicotine than stated and additives that had a greater effect on him. He also said that the brand’s ventilation system, developed to reduce the intake or tar, was designed so it was unconsciously blocked by the smoker.

Due to its status as a test case, the matter was brought before the High Court in its first instance. . . .

“My lawyer received a letter from the health minister this morning in which she said that she intended to regulate the tobacco industry, so perhaps there is some victory there,” Jensen said.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Genes
· Cancer
· Editorial
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark

EDITORIAL: Variation in risk of second primary cancer  

CMAJ cmaj.111424; published ahead of print November 28, 2011,
Jump to full article: Canadian Medical Association Journal (ca), 2011-11-28
Author: Marcy Winget and Yutaka Yasui

Intro:

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Genes
· Cancer
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark

Associations between first and second primary cancers: a population-based study 

CMAJ November 28, 2011 First published November 28, 2011, doi: 10.1503/cmaj.110167
Jump to full article: Canadian Medical Association Journal (ca), 2011-11-28

Intro:

Interpretation: Excess risk of a second primary cancer was due mainly to a 2.2-fold risk of the second cancer being the same type as the first, whereas the risk of it being a different type was only 1.1-fold. However, heterogeneity among cancer types was substantial.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Genes
· Cancer
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark

Risk of second cancer in cancer survivors mainly confined to the same cancer type as the first 

Jump to full article: EurekAlert, 2011-11-28

Intro:

Cancer survivors have more than double the risk of a second primary cancer of the same type, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), whereas the risk of a second primary cancer of another type was only slightly elevated.

Danish researchers looked at data for the entire population of Denmark . . .

"The striking contrast between the 2.2-fold increased risk of a second primary cancer being the same type as the first and the 1.1-fold increased risk of it being different from the first cancer suggests that characteristics of the individual patient were involved," writes Dr. Stig Bojesen of Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital and the University of Copenhagen, with coauthors. "The risk of a second primary cancer seems to be specific to cancer type and is probably driven by the patient's genetic and lifestyle risk factors."

They also looked at the association of the first cancer to smoking because it is known to increase the risks of many types of cancer. "We were surprised to see that in our study, the risk of other smoking-related cancers in patients surviving a smoking-related cancer was only 1.2-fold," said Dr. Bojesen. "The good news is that in the individual cancer survivor, the increased risk of a new cancer is mainly confined to the same cancer as the first -- even in people with an unhealthy lifestyle such as smoking."

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Lung Cancer
non-USA, by Country
· Denmark

No Link Between Selenium, Lower Lung Cancer Risk  

Jump to full article: Reuters, 2011-11-09

Intro:

Despite some evidence tying the mineral selenium to a reduced risk of lung cancer, a new long-term study sees no connection between the two.

In fact, researchers found that among heavy smokers, those with the highest selenium levels had a greater risk of dying from lung cancer than those with the lowest levels.

The reason for that finding is not known, and it may have nothing to do with selenium itself. But the researchers say they cannot rule out the possibility that heavy smoking and high selenium somehow act together to promote lung cancer.

The bottom line for smokers is that the best way to curb your lung cancer risk is still to kick the habit.

"The best advice regarding smoking is: Stop," lead researcher Poul Suadicani, of Bispebjerg University Hospital in Copenhagen, told Reuters Health in an email.

The study, reported in the European Respiratory Journal, included more than 3,300 older Danish men followed for 16 years. At the start, all had their blood selenium levels measured.

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Denmark
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