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GLANTZ: Prop 29 opponents California Taxpayers Assn and California Hispanic Chambers of Commerce have financial ties to Philip Morris  

Jump to full article: Stanton Glantz blog (UCSF), 2012-04-22
Author: Submitted by sglantz on Sun, 2012-04-22 19:00

Intro:

The California Taxpayers Association (CalTax) and the California Hispanic Chambers of Commerce, which signed the "No on 29" ballot arguments have long histories of working with the cigarette companies, including "donations" from Philip Morris over the years.

You can see the documents in the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library on them by clicking on these links for CalTax and California Hispanic Chambers of Commerce.

Without much looking, I found payments totaling $30,000 to CalTax from Philip Morris in 2000 and 2001 and totaling $35,000 to the California Hispanic Chambers of Commerce in 1998 and 1999. My guess is with a little more looking one could find lots more.

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Categories
· Business (Tobacco)
· Teen Smoking/Youth
· Tobacco Control
· Smokefree Policies
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· E-cigs
USA, by State
· Massachusetts

City eyes tougher public smoking rules  

Jump to full article: Lawrence (MA) Eagle-Tribune, 2012-04-22
Author: Mike LaBella

Intro:

Those scenarios would end if the city's Health Board adopts new public rules proposed for Haverhill. The board is considering regulations aimed at protecting the public from second-hand cigarette smoke by limiting where people can light up.

Health Board member Peter Carbone said the new regulations are a work in progress and he expects changes once the board begins to gather public input and holds public hearings. He said the board announced its plans to stiffen smoking rules at its March meeting and will discuss a draft of the proposed new regulations May 8.

"Health costs are rising. Smoking is a proven health hazard, as is second-hand smoking, so to protect the general health of the public we want to stiffen these regulations," Carbone said. "We used (the town of) Athol's bylaws as our model. That town's laws were challenged but were upheld by the court."

Proposal targets young people, public areas

Under Haverhill's proposed regulations, pharmacies would no longer be able to sell tobacco products. This would impact eight businesses in the city: Two Rite Aids, two Walgreens and four CVS stores.

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Categories
· Teen Smoking/Youth
· Secondhand Smoke
· Smokefree Policies
· Households
· Parenting / Family issues

Smoking Could Affect More Than Just a Parent's Health  

Many courts now consider a parent's smoking a determining factor when making child timesharing decisions.
Jump to full article: DigitalJournal.com (blog), 2012-04-22

Categories
· Health/Science
· Cessation
· Smokefree Policies
non-USA, by Country
· Hong Kong

Stopping smoking is hard despite success of smoke-free legislation 

New study presented at the World Congress of Cardiology organized by the World Heart Federation
Jump to full article: EurekAlert, 2012-04-20

Intro:

The successful implementation of smokefree legislation in Hong Kong has led to an overall decrease in the total number of smokers but the remaining smokers who are finding it difficult to quit are going on to become "hardcore" smokers, according to a new study from Hong Kong presented today at the World Congress of Cardiology.

Hardcore smokers are defined as those smokers that (1) are daily smokers, (2) have a smoking history of at least six years, (3) have never tried to quit, (4) don't want to quit smoking, (5) smoke at least 11 cigarettes, on average, each day and (6) are 26 years or older.

The study found that the number of remaining smokers in Hong Kong who went on to become hardcore smokers grew from 23.8 per cent (2005) to 29.4 per cent (2008) of the male smoking population and from 10.6 per cent (2005) to 16.3 per cent (2008) of women who smoke.

"The increase in hardcore smokers is a worrying trend," said, Dr. Doris Leung, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. "Smokefree legislation has gone a long way in reducing the overall number of smokers in Hong Kong but what we now need is to look more closely at how we can help those remaining individuals with serious tobacco habits to stop smoking."

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Cessation
· Nicotine
· Vaccines

Smoking Cessation Worth It Despite Dim Outcomes  

Jump to full article: MedPage Today, 2012-04-22
Author: By John Gever, Senior Editor, MedPage Today

Intro:

Action Points

* Drugs and counseling to help patients stop smoking typically double the odds of success relative to solo cold-turkey attempts, but success rates still seldom exceed 20%.

* Point out that so-called electronic cigarettes may not actually reduce the harm of smoking, are largely unregulated devices, and without evidence of their long-term health effects at present.

NEW ORLEANS -- Drugs and counseling to help patients stop smoking typically double the odds of success relative to solo cold-turkey attempts, but success rates still seldom exceed 20%, a researcher said here.

The bottom-line message: "Keep trying," said Michael K. Ong, MD, PhD, of the University of California Los Angeles, in a presentation at the American College of Physicians' annual meeting.

Existing approaches to smoking cessation will remain the best available for the foreseeable future, Ong suggested, and even though their effectiveness is modest at best, they are better than letting patients fend for themselves.

He noted that clinicians are often reluctant to assist patients with these problems.

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Categories
· Smokefree Policies
non-USA, by Country
· Russia

Russia to ban smoking indoors  

Jump to full article: Yahoo! India News, 2012-04-21

Categories
· Smokefree Policies
· Outdoors
non-USA, by Country
· Ireland

Smoking ban on cards for beaches and parks 

Jump to full article: Irish Examiner (ie), 2012-04-21

Categories
· Health/Science
· Cardio-vascular
· Food/Diet/Obesity
non-USA, by Country
· Greece

Omega-3 fatty acids may help to reduce the physical harm caused by smoking 

New study presented at the World Congress of Cardiology organized by the World Heart Federation
Jump to full article: EurekAlert, 2012-04-20

Intro:

The study, carried out in Greece, assessed the effect of four-week oral treatment with 2 g/day of omega-3 fatty acids on the arterial wall properties of cigarette smokers. The results showed that short-term treatment with omega-3 fatty acids improves arterial stiffness and moderates the acute smoking-induced impairment of vascular elastic properties in smokers.

"These findings suggest that omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the detrimental effects of smoking on arterial function, which is an independent prognostic marker of cardiovascular risk," said Dr. Gerasimos Siasos, University of Athens Medical School, 1st Department of Cardiology, "Hippokration" Hospital. "The cardioprotective effects of omega-3 fatty acids appear to be due to a synergism between multiple, intricate mechanisms involving anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Furthermore, AHA recommends that people without documented history of coronary heart disease should consume a variety of fish (preferably oily - rich in omega-3 fatty acids) at least twice per week."

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Federal/National
· Labels/Lights

Tobacco Branding, Plain Packaging, Pictorial Warnings, and Symbolic Consumption (PDF) (FREE FULL TEXT) 

Jump to full article: Qualitative Health Research, 2012-04-02

Intro:

Discussion

Our research adds to knowledge of symbolic consumption theory, which posits that consumers use brands to access, create, and then communicate attributes about themselves to others (Belk, 1988; Belk et al., 1982; Fournier, 1998; Levy, 1959; Solomon, 1983). Because symbolic consumption contributes to individuals’ social persona, it explains how plain cigarette packaging, which replaces aspirational imagery with tainted messages, undermines smokers’ ability to use brands in their identity cocreation. By disrupting the associations between a brand and desirable attributes, plain cigarette packaging and larger warnings reduce the value gained by consuming that brand; thus, even addicted smokers driven to continue consumption gain fewer benefits. Those at risk of smoking experimentation and addiction receive important aversive messages that could help maintain their smoke-free status. These same messages could support those relinquishing their addiction and aspiring to become smoke free, and would contribute to the development of new social norms based around tobacco-free identities.

The themes identified in our study reflect evidence from internal industry documents and tobacco branding research, which highlight the pivotal role cigarette brands play when used by adolescent and young adult smokers to cocreate social persona (Carter, 2003; Scheffels, 2008; Wakefield et al., 2008; Wakefield et al., 2002). According to symbolic consumption theory, smokers buy cigarette brands as much to access psychological and social attributes as to satiate physiological needs. Without brand symbols to confer these benefits, and with larger pictorial health warnings that actively challenge and usurp the cachet formerly associated with tobacco brands, plain cigarette packaging exposes tobacco products as unexciting sources of nicotine. Not only would the lack of branding fail to augment smokers’social personae, it would actively detract from the qualities they seek, identify them with undesired groups, and reduce the status they formerly obtained and still sought.

Implications for Smoke-Free Interventions

Although still driven by their addiction, several smokers commented ruefully on plain packs’ lack of identity, which they thought would detract from their experience of smoking, and how they constructed and communicated their social persona. This sense of potential loss that plain cigarette packaging would represent emerged irrespective of participants’ gender or ethnicity. Plain cigarette packaging presents an unambiguous, uncompromising message about smoking that reinforced nonsmokers’ negative perceptions of smoking and their disbelief that smokers could willingly consume a product that would compromise their health. Because plain packs would reinforce many nonsmokers’ rejection of smoking and undermine the value smokers received, it could promote a change in norms, and more actively deter initiation and encourage cessation (Carter, 2003; Dewhirst & Davis, 2005; Eadie et al., 1999).

The negative associations plain cigarette packaging elicited depended not only on removal of branding, but also on covering the pack surface with larger pictorial health warnings. To protect against the misleading impressions created by color associations, any plain colors used as background to brand information would require testing to ensure they did not connote unintended (and potentially positive) meanings. For example, brown, which other studies have used, could give rise to “natural” connotations, because recycled packaging typically uses a brown shade. Similarly, white, which is traditionally used in the generic packaging of store-brand products, has often been paired with “light” variants that misleadingly suggest a reduced-harm product. The Australian government has proposed using a dark olive green color on plain packaging, and other countries might also wish to research how effectively this color could promote smoke-free behaviors.

Given that color generates varied connotations, future research could explore associations with specific colors and shades to ensure that plain packages feature the least evocative and appealing color as background. Legislation introducing plain packaging should remove the ability for tobacco companies to provide free cigarette samples in countries where sales promotions still occur. It should also ensure that alternative packaging, such as cases and covers, cannot be sold legally by either tobacco companies or packaging manufacturers. Failure to close this potential loophole could spawn the development of cases that have greater cachet and appeal than the brands formerly featured on tobacco packages. The smoke-free legislation prohibiting tobacco merchandising that many countries already have might provide a precedent for these measures, and so could preempt actions designed to circumvent plain tobacco packaging. These symbiotic policy measures would undermine smokers’ ability to create value and receive reinforcement from tobacco brands, and reduce incentives for nonsmokers to experiment with tobacco.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Federal/National
· Labels/Lights

Tobacco Branding, Plain Packaging, Pictorial Warnings, and Symbolic Consumption 

Published online before print December 27, 2011, doi: 10.1177/1049732311431070 Qual Health Res May 2012 vol. 22 no. 5 630-639
Jump to full article: Qualitative Health Research, 2012-04-22

Categories
· Health/Science
· Federal/National
· Tobacco Control
· Labels/Lights
non-USA, by Country
· New Zealand

Lame, boring, filthy ... how plain smokes look 

Jump to full article: New Zealand Herald, 2012-04-23
Author: Martin Johnston

Intro:

The claim by New Zealand's main tobacco companies that plain packaging will not reduce the prevalence of smoking has been dismissed by a researcher who tested the concept. . . .

But Otago University marketing expert Professor Janet Hoek yesterday questioned what evidence the tobacco industry was relying on. She pointed to a number of papers that she and New Zealand colleagues had had published in peer-reviewed scientific journals - as well as overseas research - which showed the industry's claims and opinions were wrong.

"We've got very strong research evidence that plain packaging makes smoking very unattractive to young people and young adults."

One study Professor Hoek cited involved group discussions and in-depth interviews with 86 young adults, both smokers and non-smokers, about tobacco packaging including their views about sample plain white packets with expanded health warnings which they were shown.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Cessation
· Hookahs/Shisha / Water Pipes
non-USA, by Country
· UK
· Qatar

Shisha no alternative to quitting smoking: expert  

Jump to full article: Gulf Times (qa), 2012-04-22

Categories
· Health/Science
· Cessation
· Obit
non-USA, by Country
· Taiwan

Exercise helps smokers to quit smoking, to remain smoke-free and to reduce the risk of death 

New study presented at the World Congress of Cardiology organized by the World Heart Federation
Jump to full article: EurekAlert, 2012-04-20

Categories
· Health/Science
· Business (Tobacco)
· Tobacco Control
· Labels/Lights
· Advertising/Promos

Cigarette advertising in the Republic of Korea: a case illustration of The One ($$) 

Online First * > Article Tob Control doi:10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050315
Jump to full article: Tobacco Control, 2012-04-22
Author: * Timothy Dewhirst1, * Wonkyong Beth Lee2

Intro:

In this paper, we provide a semiotic analysis of packaging and promotions for KT&G's The One, which is a brand with a relatively low machine-measured tar delivery. Semiotics refers to the theory of signs, and offers an interpretive approach to the study of signs and produced meanings.5–7 As will be seen in this paper, The One packaging makes use of ‘white space’ to convey prestige, purity and healthiness consequently, it is argued that the use of white is generally ill-advised for plain packaging prototypes. We present several examples to show that important obligations of the WHO's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) have …

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Categories
· Teen Smoking/Youth
· Tobacco Control
· Philanthropy/Funding
non-USA, by Country
· UK

Merseyside anti-smoking campaign under fire for giving away cigarettes as part of health campaign  

Jump to full article: Liverpool Daily Post & Echo (uk), 2012-04-21
Author: Marc Waddington, Liverpool Echo

Intro:

A MERSEYSIDE taxpayer-funded charity is promoting an anti-smoking campaign - by giving away free cigarettes.

Tobacco Free Futures sent out the packs as part of its campaign about how packaging is alluring to children and can lead them to become hooked on smoking. The charity said it had only sent packs out to a small number of people in the media in the North West to try to highlight the dangers of smoking to "people with influence, including MPs".

But the move has been slammed by leading city politicians, who are demanding answers of the city's Primary Care Trust - and Westminster - as to why public money was being put into the pockets of big tobacco firms.

It is not known how many packs the charity sent out, but each mailing cost around £20 a time.

The organisation, which used to be known as Smoke Free North West, today defended its decision, but opponents of the scheme said the idea of an ant-smoking charity giving out free cigarettes was "beyond parody".

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