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Categories
· Business (Tobacco)
· Unions
non-USA, by Country
· UK

Nottingham tobacco workers in protest over parking levy 

The parking levy is being introduced to help pay for public transport improvements, including tram lines
Jump to full article: BBC Online, 2012-04-30

Categories
· Business (Tobacco)
· Roll-your-own
USA, by State
· Tennessee

Tennessee Senate Passes Roll-Your-Own Tobacco Bill 

The bill would require retailers to pay a cigarette tax and $500 licensing fee for each RYO machine.
Jump to full article: National Association of Convenience Stores (NACS), 2012-04-30

Categories
· Settlements
· Cessation
· Tobacco Control
· Addiction
· Philanthropy/Funding
· Editorial
USA, by State
· Connecticut

EDITORIAL: State Grabs Money Meant For Quitting Smoking 

Tobacco Addiction: Connecticut's government is as venal as the tobacco companies
Jump to full article: Hartford (CT) Courant, 2012-04-30

Intro:

When it comes to tobacco addiction, Connecticut's state government has been nearly as exploitative and venal as the tobacco companies it went after more than a dozen years ago.

The state led the nation in suing Big Tobacco, with then-Attorney General Richard Blumenthal demanding compensation for the high cost of Medicaid patients who are prone to smoke. The idea was that tobacco companies would give states money to care for the ill — and prevent others from becoming addicted.

The argument won the day. Connecticut and 45 other states won billions of dollars in 1998 as part of the historic tobacco settlement. But hypocrisy soon followed.

This income stream of $100 million-plus annually will end in 11 more years. It has become little more than a slush fund to pay for practically everything but quitting smoking. . . .

Between 2000 and 2009, according to an excellent Yankee Institute study (bit.ly/tobaccoct), of the $1.3 billion sent to Connecticut from the settlement, only $134 million went to the Tobacco and Health Trust Fund. But it gets even worse: The state government raided that "trust fund" of all but $9.2 million for other goals.

Mr. Blumenthal, now U.S. senator, says, "We should be embarrassed and ashamed that one of the nation's leading states in public health is failing to use the money to help people quit. "

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Cardio-vascular
· Inflammation/infections/immunity

Smoking Linked to Worse Outcomes in Joint Replacement 

Hip and knee patients who smoked needed more revision surgery.
Jump to full article: Arthritis Today , 2012-04-30
Author: Dorothy Foltz-Gray

Intro:

Two studies presented at the 2012 annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeon highlight the dangers that smoking poses to patients receiving total knee or hip implants.

The first study looked at more than 600 total knee replacements (in patients with an average age of 62), performed between 2005 and 2009 at the Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, and the Bonutti Clinic of Effingham, Illinois. Among the patients, approximately 115 were smokers.

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Categories
· Fires/Injuries
· Real Estate
· Households
USA, by State
· Colorado

Smoking Leads To Apartment Fire, Leaves Man With Burn Injuries 

Jump to full article: KKTV 11 (Colorado Springs / Pueblo, CO), 2012-04-30

Categories
· Fires/Injuries
USA, by State
· Texas

Parker County fire marshal investigating fatal fire, possibly started by cigarette 

Jump to full article: Dallas Morning News, 2012-04-30

Categories
· Teen Smoking/Youth
· Business (General)
non-USA, by Country
· New Zealand

Anger over candy cigarettes  

Jump to full article: Otago Daily Times (nz), 2012-05-01

Intro:

The sale of look-a-like lolly cigarettes, whose consumption by children is linked to becoming a smoker, has been condemned by Associate Health Minister Tariana Turia.

Lucky Lights bubblegum, Victory candy and other American brands of mock cigarettes are on sale in New Zealand, alongside the local Spaceman candy sticks - all quite legally.

The American brands are in packets that bear similarities to real cigarette packets and the bubblegum stick's wrapping makes it look like a cigarette with a filter.

The candy sticks all look a bit like a hand-rolled cigarette. The products cost around $1.70 to $1.80.

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Categories
· Society
· People
USA, by State
· California

Chelsea Handler: I paid $500 to have a pack of ‘Russian hooker’ cigarettes delivered to my home  

The funny lady found herself in even more trouble when she realized she didn't have her wallet
Jump to full article: New York Daily News, 2012-04-30
Author: Cristina Everett

Intro:

In a podcast interview with “WTF with Marc Maron,” which aired Monday, the outspoken host of “Chelsea Lately” admitted she recently paid $500 to have a pack of cigarettes delivered to her doorstep.

Handler, 37, recalled inviting some co-workers to have drinks at her Bel Air home, where the group ended up playing ping pong and watching the tear-inducing romantic-drama, “Like Crazy.”

“I smoke sometimes when I drink,” explained Handler, whose list of best-selling books includes “Are You There Vodka? It’s Me, Chelsea.” “I like to smoke when I drink so I only drink a couple nights a week, actually.”

“Around 1 in the morning, I decided I wanted a cigarette so we called Yummy.com,” she continued. . . .

“I called them back and said ‘I will give you $500 if you bring me a pack of Capris.’ And they’re like, ‘What are Capris?’” she said. “I’m like ‘They’re for Russian hookers and we need a pack of Capris and I will give you $500.’”

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Categories
· Business (Tobacco)
· E-cigs
Organizations
· Lorillard

Lorillard's Feeling blu  

Jump to full article: Daily Finance (AOL), 2012-04-30

Categories
· Smokefree Policies
· Sports/Games
· Outdoors
non-USA, by Country
· India

Anti-tobacco campaign during IPL  

Jump to full article: The Times of India, 2012-04-30

Intro:

A court in Jaipur recently summoned team Kolkata boss Shahrukh Khan for smoking in public during an IPL match on April 8. That was at SMS Stadium. Three weeks later, a massive anti-tobacco campaign would hit the boundaries of Barabati stadium at Cuttack on Tuesday.

As Pune will lock horns with Hyderabad, anti-tobacco brigade will compete with cheerleaders in the off-the-field activities. "Managers, organizers, government, civil society and stadium authorities are all set to be involved in spreading anti-tobacco messages among the viewers and passersby," said Itishree Kanungo, an anti-tobacco activist.

Voluntary Health Association of India -- Aparajita, a health organization working in the field of tobacco control, is coordinating this campaign at the stadium.

During the event, there will be display of tobacco control messages. At the entrances of the stadium "No smoking" signages would be displayed. There will be awareness among the audience while they are in the lines to enter into the stadium. Handouts containing anti-tobacco messages will be distributed among people outside the stadium.

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Categories
· Fires/Injuries
· Litter
· Dining/Entertainment
USA, by State
· Maine

Al’s Bar in Medway damaged in fire caused by cigarette butts in garbage can  

Jump to full article: Bangor (ME) Daily News, 2012-04-30
Author: Nick McCrea

Intro:

The assistant chief said the state fire marshal’s office investigated the fire Monday morning and found that the fire started in a garbage can in the “beer garden,” an outside area where patrons go to smoke.

Hale said it appears someone disposed of hot cigarette butts or emptied an ashtray into the garbage can, which was set against the wall of the building.

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Categories
· Fires/Injuries
· Households
USA, by State
· Texas

Lit cigarette may be cause of fatal house fire in Parker County  

Jump to full article: KDAF-TV The 33 (Dallas, TX), 2012-04-30

Categories
· Society
· Smokefree Policies
· History
USA, by State
· Missouri

THIS WEEK IN LOCAL HISTORY: Agents raided Mid-Missouri strip clubs  

Jump to full article: Columbia (MO) Tribune, 2012-04-26
Author: Bill Clark

Intro:

25 YEARS AGO

From the Centralia Fireside Guard, April 29, 1987: The Boone County Courthouse was set to go smokeless on May 15 — almost. The city of Columbia enacted an ordinance restricting smoking in public buildings, but the Boone County Commission made a change at the courthouse because it was not a part of city government.

Smoking in courtrooms was already banned. Individual offices within the courthouse would be allowed to designate a private smoking area.

Northern District Commissioner Alex Gates was a smoker but voted for the ban.

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Categories
· Health/Science
· Nicotine

Salimetrics Salivary Cotinine Assay Now Available as an In-Vitro Medical Device 

Now medical professionals and researchers who need assessments of exposure to nicotine from tobacco products can be assured of highly accurate and reliable results from the Salimetrics High Sensitiv
Jump to full article: PR Web, 2012-04-30

Categories
· Health/Science
· Food/Diet/Obesity
· costs/finances

As America's waistline expands, costs soar 

Jump to full article: Reuters, 2012-04-30
Author: Sharon Begley

Intro:

The startling economic costs of obesity, often borne by the non-obese, could become the epidemic's second-hand smoke. Only when scientists discovered that nonsmokers were developing lung cancer and other diseases from breathing smoke-filled air did policymakers get serious about fighting the habit, in particular by establishing nonsmoking zones. The costs that smoking added to Medicaid also spurred action. Now, as economists put a price tag on sky-high body mass indexes (BMIs), policymakers as well as the private sector are mobilizing to find solutions to the obesity epidemic. . . .

Obesity-related absenteeism costs employers as much as $6.4 billion a year, health economists led by Eric Finkelstein of Duke University calculate . . .

One recent surprise is the discovery that the costs of obesity exceed those of smoking. In a paper published in March, scientists at the Mayo Clinic toted up the exact medical costs of 30,529 Mayo employees, adult dependents, and retirees over several years.

"Smoking added about 20 percent a year to medical costs," said Mayo's James Naessens. "Obesity was similar, but morbid obesity increased those costs by 50 percent a year. There really is an economic justification for employers to offer programs to help the very obese lose weight." . . .

For years researchers suspected that the higher medical costs of obesity might be offset by the possibility that the obese would die young, and thus never rack up spending for nursing homes, Alzheimer's care, and other pricey items.

That's what happens to smokers. While they do incur higher medical costs than nonsmokers in any given year, their lifetime drain on public and private dollars is less because they die sooner. "Smokers die early enough that they save Social Security, private pensions, and Medicare" trillions of dollars, said Duke's Finkelstein. "But mortality isn't that much higher among the obese."

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