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· Secondhand Smoke
· Pets/Animals

Risks of secondhand smoke to pets is studied 

Dogs, cats can develop respiratory difficulties
Jump to full article: Winston-Salem (NC) Journal, 2004-03-25
Author: Faith Ford / MEDIA GENERAL NEWS SERVICE

Intro:

A study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology reported that dogs living in smokers' homes were at a 60 percent greater risk of lung cancer. A second study from the Journal showed long-nosed dogs living in smoking households were twice as likely to get nasal cancer.

Another study conducted by Tufts University veterinarians suggested that cats living in smokers' homes were three times as likely to get lymphoma, a common feline disease.

Dr. Saralyn Smith-Carr, an associate veterinary professor at Auburn University, said she has not seen enough evidence to link secondhand smoke to cancer in dogs and cats. Smith-Carr said second-hand smoke can have adverse effects on household pets.

"I don't think secondhand smoke is good for any person or animal," she said.

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