[Headlines Only] [Top Stories Only]
Categories
· Health/Science
· Mental Health/Neurology
· Aging/Elderly
non-USA, by Country
· UK

Study: Smoking May Lead to Faster Cognitive Decline in Men 

In a new study, middle-aged men who smoked did worse on tests of cognitive ability over time, but women who lit up didn't show the same declines.
Jump to full article: TIME Magazine, 2012-02-07
Author: Alice Park | Healthland | TIME.com

Intro:

the latest study shows that smoking is associated with cognitive decline as early as age 45, and that male smokers may be more vulnerable to these mental effects than women.

For the study published in the journal Archives of General Psychiatry, researchers led by Severine Sabia, a research associate in the department of epidemiology and public health at University College London, gave cognitive tests to 7,236 middle aged men and women three times between 1997-99 and 2007-09, when they were 44-69 years old, 50-74 years old and 55-80 years old.

The researchers also collected the participants’ 20-year smoking history through regular self-reported questionnaires.

And when they compared the cognitive scores to smoking status, they found that men who smoked showed faster decline than nonsmoking men over 10 years.The size of the effect associated with smoking was similar to that of 10 years of aging. Even after Sabia and her colleagues adjusted for the effects of heart disease, stroke and lung function on mental abilities, the effect of smoking remained strong. The more men smoked, the greater their decline. What’s more, the study showed for the first time that the smoking-related cognitive declines may begin as early as age 45.

Jump to full article »